Vitamin K

Vitamin K is one of the thirteen vitamins, which are good for the functioning of the body. This vitamin is very important for blood clotting in the body, but most likely also has an important function in the creation of new bones.

Vitamin K, also known as phyloquinone, is partly produced by bacteria in the intestines. The amount of this is often not sufficient, so that it must also be obtained from outside. This can be in the form of food or nutritional supplements.

What is it in?

First of all, we need to further decompose this vitamin. It consists of vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) and vitamin K2 (menaquinones). The K1 variant can mainly be found in green leafy vegetables and (vegetable) oils. K2 can be found in cheese, egg and milk products.

Too much vitamin K.

In fact, a surplus is almost non-existent. In cases where it does occur, it has hardly any negative consequences for the internal functioning of the body. Often the body ensures that, through the natural way, the excess of vitamins (whatever) leaves the body through the urine.

Vitamin K deficiency

When there is a shortage of vitamin K, this does have consequences for the body. It ensures that blood clotting is slowed down and can lead to bleeding. Often the above does not occur often and if it does occur, it is or in newborn babies (the intestines often still have to start and produce some vitamin themselves), people with a serious absorption disorder of vitamin K or use of long-term antibiotics, which cause the gut bacteria, which normally make part of the vitamin, to destroy.

 

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